Consumer Alert: Dexcom Recall

Dexcom, manufacturer of one of the most widely used continuous glucose monitoring systems, has officially recalled its G4 and G5 Platinum systems. This follows notification of users by certified letter that alerts for high or low bg levels may not be heard. The letter pointed to speaker malfunction as the problem and promised to have the problem fixed soon. I know for a fact, however, that speakers are NOT the problem. Two months ago, I woke at 4am to multiple alerts on my phone–two hours of them, in fact. I was shocked that I had slept through them–I’m a light sleeper and that was a lot of alerts, one every five minutes for two hours! I was doubtful, so I called Dexcom. They were super professional and concerned, but they did what I feared they would. They suggested I slept through the alerts.

Two weeks later, I received the first of two certified letters informing that I was not alone. There had been hundreds of calls similar to mine–people weren’t “hearing” alerts. Dexcom suggested the speakers were malfunctioning and promised to fix the problem.

I was doubtful. I rely on the Dexcom Share app.–an app that works through the cloud to send BG readings to my phone. It is one thing if the Dexcom receiver speakers don’t work, but that should not affect the alarm on my phone app. The phone app alarms operate independently from the receiver my son carries with him. For instance, my son can have his receiver set to alarm when his BG drops below 80, but I can set my phone app to alarm at, say, 90 mg/dL. So even if the speaker is broken on his receiver, my phone app should sound an alarm regardless. I am convinced it didn’t do so the night I describe above, and I know it did not sound an alarm on March 14. I was in my office with my phone sitting on my desk when I noticed the text alert pop up on my iPhone. No audible alarm, though. I called school and spoke to my son. His receiver said 72, but he never heard the low BG alarm. Houston, we have a problem and it isn’t the speakers.

According to denizens of individuals on discussion boards, it seems these problems started occurring immediately after a software update. I can only hope Dexcom addresses the real issue and doesn’t go the route Toyota did when it had an acceleration problem caused by a flaw in software, but instead spent millions of dollars replacing drivers’ floor mats. Time will tell. In the meantime, we will use our Dexcom and set our clock alarm every couple of hours to ensure my son’s BG doesn’t go low overnight.

For more info on reported problems with the Dexcom G4 and G5 receivers, read here.

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